Please indicate which show you are submitting to in the title of your piece.

Ends on April 30, 2017$10.00
$10.00

Announcing the brand new, first ever So Say We All Literary Prize in Fiction! One first place winner will receive a $250 prize and publication online and in print. We are excited to explore our first literary contest. And! We are extra excited (and feeling a bit fannish) because our inaugural contest will be judged by the amazing Leesa Cross-Smith.

Leesa Cross-Smith is the author of Every Kiss a War and the editor of WhiskeyPaper. Her work has appeared in Best Small Fictions. She loves baseball and musicals. Find more @ LeesaCrossSmith.com and WhiskeyPaper.com.

Contest Guidelines:

  • We are looking for fiction short stories
  • Surprise us. We want your beautiful, your weird, your uncouth, your unexpected, your experiments, your sadness, your joy, your fear. Story is our currency here: give us characters we can’t forget doing things we can’t forget.
  • Length: under 3,000 words please.
  • Please make sure your submission does not have your name or any identifying information in the attachment
  • One story per $10 entry fee. Multiple submissions are fine, as long as each is its own entry with its own $10 entry fee.
  • Simultaneous submissions are also just fine. However, if your work gets picked up elsewhere, please withdraw immediately. Entry fees are, regretfully, not refundable.

Contest Details:

  • Submission window: 1/15/17 – 4/30/17
  • Deadline: April 30th, 2017 at 11:59 PM pacific time
  • $10 entry fee
  • $250 prize for one first place winner
  • Blind submission process! No names in your files!
  • The winner’s story will be illustrated, published in The Radvocate Issue Fifteen, and published online on our website.
  • The top five finalists will also be published in The Radvocate Issue Fifteen.
  • All contest entries will be considered for publication in The Radvocate Issue Fifteen.
  • We love you and cannot wait to read your work and share it with Leesa.
So Say We All is a literary non-profit and small press based in San Diego, CA. Our mission is to create opportunities for individuals to tell their stories, and tell them better, through three core priorities: publishing, performance, and education. SSWA offers education outreach programs specifically targeting communities who have been talked about disproportionately more than heard from in mainstream media. To learn more, visit www.sosayweallonline.com, or follow us: twitter / instagram / facebook.

READ FIRST:

Submit here for SSWA's monthly VAMP (Visual / Audio Monologue Performance) Showcase only. Please include a brief bio and your e-mail in the comments section when submitting. VAMPs are usually, unless otherwise noted, held on the last Thursday of the month.

Our list of all VAMP shows, themes, and submission deadlines can be found here.

Work should fall between 5-10 minutes in length. Between 140-160 words per minute is an average guide. Style, voice, and literary form can vary widely, but we're looking for true, non-fiction stories that involve a transformation (of you, a character, a place, etc.) and offer an insight that we can relate to.

Please be aware that there is a rehearsal and critique process for all accepted VAMP submissions. Rehearsals & crits are MANDATORY. If your piece is accepted and you can't make the first scheduled rehearsal, please let us know right away. All reasonable accommodations will me made. We want you to give the best performance possible when we put you on stage.

All scripts are read and voted on by a blind peer review panel comprised of individuals who have performed at previous VAMP Showcases, to ensure bias or nepotism does not affect the selection process. Therefore, please DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON YOUR SCRIPT.

Thanks, good luck, and please don't be disheartened if you aren't selected. I founded this organization and I've been rejected multiple times myself. A rejection is not a statement on the quality of your writing, there are dozens of factors at play when putting a show together, and we want it to always be a reflection of our community and the people who comprise it.

Best,

- Justin Hudnall


Ends on April 30, 2017
The Radvocate is a literary arts journal, published by So Say We All, and edited by a dedicated team of volunteers under the direction of its creator and Editor-in-Chief, Matt Lewis.

Submissions are currently open for Issue Fifteen from January 15th, 2017 - April 30th, 2017

The Radvocate features the fiction, non-fiction, poetry and visual art of people who acknowledge the state of the world and strive to reflect it in their work, individuals who read independently, think critically, and will help us shout to those who would control us: “We are not afraid." We will not relegate your piece to the abyss for being too genre, too serious, too comedic, too this or too that. What we are looking for is the best of the best, across the entire spectrum, to include in our glorious hodgepodge tribute to the written word. Bring us your fiction, your non-fiction, your huddled poems yearning to breathe free. 

We recommend works shorter than 3,000 words. Artwork should be at least 300 dpi in quality, Jpegs preferred. 

We are currently reading for issue 15. Submissions close April 30th, 2015.

So Say We All is honored to be collaborating with The Hausmann Quartet to produce a showcase of original stories and classical music at the The White Chapel at Liberty Station on Sunday, March 26th in the early afternoon. The Hausmann Quartet runs a concert series (Haydn Voyages) in which they explore all of the string quartets of Joseph Haydn, presented alongside works of many of his contemporaries, early influences, musical ancestors, as well as some of the most exciting composers writing today.

Haydn wrote an epic work for string quartet for a Good Friday/Easter commission, "The 7 Last Words of Christ", made up of seven movements, one for each of the last words, and ends with a musical depiction of the earthquake as its finale. It is a beautiful work that is often performed with narration.

Towards that end, So Say We All is accepting submissions of original prose and poetry that respond, interpret, evoke, or otherwise touch on one or more of the 7 passages, to be performed as an introduction to each section of music. Each submission should be 500 words in-length or less. Multiple submissions are welcome, but please submit each separately. Deadline for submission is Midnight, Friday March 3rd. Please indicate in your submission bio which passage you are responding to.

Any interpretation or direction your inspiration takes you is welcome, secular or otherwise, personal narrative or reflection on the times we live in; surprise us and sparkle.

The 7 Last Words that Haydn composed to are:
  • 1.1 1. Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.
  • 1.2 2. Today you will be with me in paradise.
  • 1.3 3. Behold your son: behold your mother.
  • 1.4 4. My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
  • 1.5 5. I thirst.
  • 1.6 6. It is finished.
  • 1.7 7. Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.

We look forward to reading your works!

- So Say We All

Ends on May 31, 2017
So Say We All is collaborating with the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation's Placemakers program to tell the story of Southeast San Diego through the prismatic lens of its inhabitants. We're looking for non-fiction narratives, essays, and poetry that take place in, directly reference, scrutinize, or interpret the area.

Here's a handy map detailing the neighborhoods and communities that encompass Southeastern SD (Imperial is ok by us, we don't care what Wikipedia says): https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/SanDiegoSoutheastMap.gif

Works should not exceed 4,500 words, however they will still be considered if they do. Want to see an example? Here's a performed story written by Michael Billingsly that debuted at our City College Showcase a few years back! Any subject matter or approach is welcome, as long as it features the neighborhood.

All accepted writers will receive edits and one-on-one coaching, will be published through the project, and are invited to perform their piece at an upcoming performance series in the fall of 2017.

Thank you for helping us tell the story of one of San Diego's most significant neighborhoods, and we look forward to reading your works!


Please submit here for the Mesa College Spring 2017 VAMP Showcase, featuring stories on the very-open-to-interpretation theme of, "(Re)Calling Home." 

Most of us can recall a version of home, for better or for worse. Write a story about where you are from: this can be figurative place or a physical location, or even a cultural identity. This theme is wide open—interpret it as you like. Dig deep, use passion. We can’t wait to read it! Send us your work!

Stories should fall somewhere between 5-10 minutes in length. Between 140-160 words per minute is an average guide. We will consider longer works, but they must really merit the extra time. Shorter or flash submissions are just fine by us also.

We accept both poetry and prose, but are looking for honest, true stories. No fiction this time around, please. Selected participants will be required to attend a group read & critique, private meetings with a literary coach, and one performance coach session. All attempts to accommodate schedules will be made, but we don't make exceptions to participation. All submissions are accepted as first drafts.

Accepted participants must be available to perform during the evening of Thursday, April 20th. Submission deadline is Tuesday, February 28th at 11:59 PM.

ONLY CURRENT STUDENTS OF MESA COLLEGE ARE ELIGIBLE. 

Write on!
- So Say We All and Mesa College
So Say We All's Veteran Writing Project and Incoming continues! New prompt themes will be forthcoming shortly, but in the meanwhile we invite veteran writers, spouses and family members of veterans, and people who have been directly affected by wars in their country of origin to send us their non-fiction, fiction, and poetry.

Stories typically run 5-12 pages in length, double-spaced, 12pt. font, with the title of the story on the front page. All stories accepted are expected to work with our editors and performers receive performance coaching prior to the showcase and / or publication.


Visit www.sosayweallonline.com for more information.
Videos from past veteran writer showcases are available here to watch: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLgJj1tFF9R0hVC6skahZ60DHV1NsnXlm
Ends on August 31, 2017

Black Candies is a journal of literary horror and darkness. In these dark corners, we have infinite room to grow, and to innovate. We’re allowed to push boundaries and set precedents. We revel in the daring. We aim to scare. Scary can be good. Scary can cause change.

This year, our theme is The Eighties. Whether you lived through it, or fetishize it, there’s no denying its continued effect.

blackcandies80s

Horror and the ‘80s go hand in hand. Movie fans can point to it as the decade where franchises like Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween, Hellraiser and Friday the 13th turned monsters into celebrities. It’s a decade that gave birth to the VHS, which allowed us to mainline horror right into our living rooms. The format also enabled a generation of crude, disgusting, and often brilliant filmmakers whose access to the expansive market gave them free reign to coat their screens with blood.

But art wasn’t the only thing that became horrific. Both consumerism and nationalism surged. Hate and bigotry blinded us to an epidemic that ravaged the country, while those in power laughed about it. We were ruled by an idiot entertainer. Any of this sound familiar?

What we’re looking for: We’re looking for stories that are set in, pay homage to, or reference the ‘80s in a major way. No smartphones, no Internet. Analog technology. Drugs. Yuppies. Wealth. Social commentary. It’s pretty open to interpretation, really. Think Stranger Things. Think nostalgia. Think Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.

What we’re not looking for: Even though splatter films ruled the era, that’s not what we want. Black Candies attempts to publish the best in literary horror. We want to be scared, shaken and disturbed by your story, but at the same time, we want to fall in love with your prose. We want it to be smart. Gore and blood is fine as long as your story doesn’t obsess over it.

No word limit, but 2,000-6,000 is ideal.

Submission deadline: August 31st, 2017